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June 2017

Cal/OSHA is reminding all employers to protect their outdoor workers from heat illness, especially those not accustomed to working in high heat conditions. Employers need to ensure workers are drinking plenty of water and taking breaks in the shade as temperatures rise across many regions of California. The National Weather Service is forecasting unusually high temperatures throughout the state, which will remain high for the rest of this week and into next week.

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Cal OSHA is reminding all employers to protect their outdoor workers from heat illness, especially those not accustomed to working in high heat conditions. Employers need to ensure workers are drinking plenty of water and taking breaks in the shade as temperatures rise across many regions of California. The National Weather Service is forecasting unusually high temperatures throughout the state, which will remain high for the rest of this week and into next week. California rules are very clear on how employers must protect their workers from heat illness.

Cal OSHA’s goal is to prevent deaths and serious illnesses and injuries caused by exposure to heat.” Special attention must be given to new employees who have not been acclimatized to working under hot conditions, as they are particularly vulnerable to heat illness. They must be monitored carefully for signs of heat illness and should, if possible, be allowed to begin work earlier in the day when the temperature is lower or gradually work up to a full schedule. Many regions of the state will be reaching temperatures in the triple digits. When temperatures reach 95 degrees or above, employers are required to implement high heat procedures to ensure outdoor workers are protected.

Procedures include effective monitoring of all workers through methods such as a mandatory buddy system for workers or regular communication with workers who work alone. California’s Heat Illness Prevention Standard requires employers to train workers on the signs and symptoms of heat illness, provide shade when temperatures exceed 80 degrees, develop emergency response procedures and train workers on how to execute those procedures when necessary. Cal OSHA inspects outdoor worksites in agriculture, construction, landscaping, and other operations throughout the heat season.

A written Injury and Illness Prevention Program is required for employer who have more than 10 employees. Documented Heat Stress training is required regardless of employee size.

If you should have any questions, please contact us 925-556-4404.